The more things change………

The Engineering counsil of South Africa doesn’t want to register black engineers. Abram Rakau claims that the counsil deliberately delayed his registration by more than a year, when he called the counsil to enquire about his registration, they said it was still being processed. The staff told him that his registration is being processed by a private company, and was being deliberately delated because the private company is being threatened by a huge influx of black engineers.
Unless I’m mistaken, you can’t work for a consulting firm, or for the government unless you are accredited by ECSA and in the next few it will be illegal to hire a non-accredited Engineer. So if things like these continue black people engineers won’t be allowed to practice. If that’s the case why does ECSA still allow private companies to process the registration of engineers. Are they also threatened by the huge influx of black engineers?
I am pissed, I honestly thought ECSA knew better last year they came to our campus and urged us to concentrate on our studies because there is a shortage of qualified black engineers in South Africa and now they are squeezing out blacks in the engineering field. This is very stupid, considering there is a shotage of Engineers( regardless of race) in this country and now they are making it impossible for non-whites to practice.
I’m about to go into industry and I wanted to get accredited by ECSA, so I’m nervous right now what will happen to me and all future black engineers. will our registration also be delayed? If they can do sh*t like this to a guy with 8 years experience in the field, what about us who are about to graduate? Something must be done about this!!
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One thought on “The more things change………

  1. I do not know what the specifics are of this case of Mr Rakua’s registration but can not believe that it is as a result of racism and that ECSA would in any way be hampering the development of black engineers. What I know of ECSA is that it is committed to helping address South Africa’s critical need for more engineers while ensuring that public safety is not compromised. The fact that ECSA registered more ‘black’ than white engineers in 2005 and 2006 seems out of step with Rakua’s experience. In 2006, 1011 ‘black’ as compared to 832 white engineers where registered. This does not in my view reflect an organisation that is deliberately hampering transformation. In fact when I look at ECSA’s initiatives it looks more like they are committed to doing the right thing in promoting and developing professional skills and that they are committed to helping to address the legacy of the past.

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